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Anatomy / Pedigree

Photographer: Kathy Landman
Good conformation starts with the bones - 205 bones make up the equine skeletal anatomy.
The neck is the most flexible portion of the horse’s spine.
A typical adult horse has forty permanent teeth.
The horse does not have a collarbone. Front legs are not attached to the rest of the skeleton.
The horse skeletal structure is held together with ligaments, tendons and muscles.
The hind quarters can propel the horse forward 40-miles an hour in six strides
Photographer: Kathy Landman

Every thoroughbred can trace its ancestry back to three foundation stallions that were imported to England in the eighteenth century: the Darley Arabian, the Byerly Turk and the Godolphin Arabian or Barb.

Photographer: Kathy Landman

The horse’s body provides three major functions: protects the internal organs, provides a skeletal structure and supports soft parts of the body.

Education Blogs

Godolphin shares a short video on the unique color transition that can happen with foals. Watch to learn more. This video has a question at the end. The answer sheet is attached under the video.       ...

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A rich brown, soft silver or warm chestnut are all beautiful colors of Thoroughbred horses. These colors are part of their markings that help to identify the animal. Markings are defined as certain colors and characteristics that appear on a horse including the overall color of the horse such...

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The height of a horse is calculated in hands. One hand is equal to 4 inches, the width of an adult hand. A horse’s height is measured from the ground to the withers (the ridge between the top of the shoulder blades, just in front of where a saddle sits on the back.) This is generally done with ...

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When it comes to foal development, it's important to have a veternarian check in on the foal shortly after delivery. This can provide furthert information of how the foal is developing and the general health and anatomy. Check out this video of Arravale'18 first vet check to see more!  First V...

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Foals are born rather mature as they can stand and eat within a few hours after delivery.  The anatomy of a foal at birth is that their legs are long, and their bodies are small. This means that a foal’s legs are very close to that of their adult length.  Their body, including the ribcage/tor...

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